Cyclones

Cyclones

Cyclones are large scale air mass that rotates around a strong center of low atmospheric pressure.
  • Based on the geographical location, the Cyclones are of two types namely Tropical Cyclones and Temperate Cyclones (Extra Tropical Cyclones).
 
TROPICAL CYCLONES
  • Tropical Cyclones are violent storms that originate over the seas in the Low pressure belt of the tropical areas and move eastward over to the coastal areas.
  • They bring about large scale destruction caused by violent winds, very heavy rainfall and storm surges which make them as one of the most devastating natural calamities.
  • They are known as Cyclones in the Indian Ocean, Hurricanes in the Atlantic, Typhoons in the Western Pacific and South China Sea, and Willy-willies in the Western Australia.
  • They originate only over the seas because of the need of continuous moisture to energize the Cyclones regularly. This is why they dissipate once reaching the land.
  • They are violent because of the energy coming from the condensation process in cumulonimbus clouds surrounding the Cyclones.
  • They move from east to west because they are facilitated by the Trade wind.
 
Cyclones
 
TEMPERATE CYCLONE
  • This system develops in the mid and high latitude (around 600 latitudes) along the polar front (boundary between the warm air and cold air).
  • As the polar front develops over entire polar frontal system, this cyclone affects a much larger area of around 2000 km. Also it develops over land and sea both as far as there is frontal system.
  • It moves from west to east due to the influence of Westerlies.
  • When the pressure drops along the front, the warm air moves northwards and the cold air move towards south setting in motion for anticlockwise cyclonic circulation.
  • The warm air glides over the cold air and a sequence of clouds appear over the sky ahead of the warm front and cause precipitation.
  • The cold front approaches the warm air from behind and pushes the warm air up. As a result, cumulus clouds develop along the cold front.
  • The cold front moves faster than the warm front ultimately overtaking the warm front. The warm air is completely lifted up and the front is occluded and the cyclone dissipates.

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