Krishna River

Krishna River

In Southern India, the Krishna River is an inter-state river. It is Peninsular India's second largest river, rising at an altitude of 1337 metres near Mahabaleshwar in Maharashtra State in the Western Ghats. It runs for about 1400 kilometres across the peninsula, from west to east, passing through Maharashtra, Karnataka, and Andhra Pradesh. Ghataprabha, Malaprabha, Bhima, and Tungabhadra are the major Krishna tributaries in Karnataka.
 
Krishna River
MORE ABOUT KRISHNA RIVER
The Krishna River is named after Mahabaleswar, which is located near Jor village in Maharashtra. The Jor Village is located in the far northwestern part of the Wai Taluka. The river eventually empties into the Bay of Bengal at Hamasaladeevi in Andhra Pradesh, on India's eastern coast.
 
The river's delta is one of India's most productive areas. The prehistoric Ikshvaku and Satavahana sun kings reigned in this area as well. Wai is Maharashtra's oldest city, located on the Krishna River's banks in the Satara District. Sangli is the largest city on the banks of the river in Maharashtra, while Vijayawada is the largest city on the banks of the river in Andhra Pradesh.
 
The Krishna River is one of the most environmentally damaging rivers in the world because it causes extensive land corrosion during the monsoon season. The river has rapids and is quite raging, reaching depths of more than 75 feet (23 metres) on several occasions. In Maharashtra's Marathi language, there is a proverb that says "santh vaahate krishnamaai" which means "calmly runs Krishna" This phrase is also used to describe how a person should be as calm as Krishna. Nevertheless, between June and August, the river's flow causes a significant amount of corrosion. Krishna brings productive soil to the delta area from Karnataka, Maharashtra, and the western part of Andhra Pradesh during this time.
 
The Tungabhadra River, which is the result of the union of two rivers - the Tunga River and the Bhadra River - is the river's most important tributary. The Western Ghat Mountain Ranges are the source of both of these rivers.
 
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From the right riverbanks, rivers like the Koyna, Venna, Panchganga, Vasna, Ghataprabha, Dudhganga, Tungabhadra, and Malaprabha meet Krishna. The Musi River, Yerla River, Bhima River, and Maneru Rivers all meet the river on the left bank at the same time.
 
Close to Sangli, three tributaries join the Krishna River. Haripur, which is also close to Sangli, is where the Warana River joins the river. Sangameshwar is another name for this area. At Narsobawadi, near Sangli, the Panchganga River joins the Krishna River. These locations are revered as sacred. Lord Dattatraya is said to have spent part of his life on the riverbanks of this river at Audumber. Sangameswaram is a popular Hindu religious centre in Andhra Pradesh's Kurnool district. The Bhavanasi and Tungabhadra rivers meet in this area, and Krishna is born. The Srisailam reservoir has submerged the Sangameswaram Temple. Pilgrims only visit this area to see this temple during the summer, when the reservoir's water level drops.
 
TRIBUTARIES OF KRISHNA RIVER
The Tungabhadra River, with a drainage basin of 71,417 km2 and a length of about 531 km, is the Krishna River's largest tributary, but the Bhima River, with a total length of 861 km and a drainage basin of 70,614 km2, is the longest.
 
Near Sangli, three tributaries, the Panchganga, Warna, and Yerla, meet the Krishna river. These locations are revered as sacred. Lord Dattatreya is said to have spent some of his days at Audumber, on the banks of the Krishna River.
 
Kudalasangama (also spelled Kudala Sangama) is a small village in the Bagalkot district of Karnataka, about 15 kilometres from the Almatti Dam. Here, the Krishna and Malaprabha rivers meet. The Aikya Mantapa, or holy Samdhi of Basavanna, the founder of the Lingayat sect of Hindu religion, is located here, along with the Linga, which is said to be self-born (Swayambhu), and the river flows east towards Srisailam (another pilgrim centre) in Andhra Pradesh.
 
Sangameswaram, in Andhra Pradesh's Kurnool district, is a popular Hindu pilgrimage site where the Tungabhadra and Bhavanasi rivers meet the Krishna river. The Sangameswaram temple is now submerged in the Srisailam reservoir, with devotees only being able to see it during the summer when the reservoir's water level drops.
 
The following are the major river's tributaries:
Andhra Pradesh
• Bhadra River
• Varada River
• Tunga River
• Veda River
• Avathi River
• Bhavanasi River in Kurnool District
• Suvarnamukhi River
• Tungabhadra River
• Vedavathi River
• Paleru River
• Musi River
• Munneru River
• Akeru River
 
Maharashtra and Karnataka
• Venna River
• Varma River
• Koyna River
• Malaprabha River
• Ghataprabha River
• Bhama River
• Pavna River
• Kumandala River
• Ghod River
• Indrayani River
• Kundali River
• Man River
• Bhogwati River
• Moshi River
• Bori River
• Chandani River
• Kamini River
• Mula River
• Mutha River
• Nira River
• Mula-Mutha River
• Bhima River
• Sina River
 
KRISHNA BASIN
The Krishna Basin covers a total area of 258,948 km2, accounting for nearly 8% of the country's total land area. Karnataka (113,271 km2), Telangana, Andhra Pradesh (76,252 km2), and Maharashtra (76,252 km2) make up this large basin (69,425 km2).
 
The Krishna river rises in the Western Ghats at an elevation of about 1,337 metres, about 64 kilometres from the Arabian Sea, just north of Mahabaleshwar. It flows for about 1,400 kilometres before discharging into the Bay of Bengal. The Ghataprabha River, Malaprabha River, Bhima River, Tungabhadra River, and Musi River are the major tributaries that join Krishna.
 
Except for the western border, which is formed by an unbroken line of the Western Ghats, the majority of this basin consists of rolling and undulating country. Black soils, red soils, laterite and lateritic soils, alluvium, mixed soils, red and black soils, and saline and alkaline soils are all important soil types found in the basin.
 
In this basin, an average annual surface water potential of 78.1 km3 has been calculated. There is 58.0 km3 of water that can be used. The basin's cultivable area is approximately 203,000 km2, accounting for 10.4% of the country's total cultivable area. The Godavari River was linked to the Krishna River in 2015 by commissioning the Polavaram right bank canal with the help of the Pattiseema lift scheme to augment water availability to the Prakasam Barrage in Andhra Pradesh, as the Krishna river's water supply became insufficient to meet demand. Prakasam Barrage's irrigation canals are part of National Waterway 4. The Krishana-Godavari delta is known as India's "Rice Granery of India."
 
Krishna River
DAMS ON KRISHNA RIVER
The Krishna River has a number of dams, including the following:
• Dhom Dam
• Dhom Balakwadi
• Almatti Dam
• Basava Sagar Dam
• Nagarjuna Sagar Dam
• Srisailam Dam
• Jurala Dam
• Narayanpur Dam (downriver of Almatti Dam)
• Prakasham Barrage
• Pulichitnthala Dam is under construction.
• Amar Dam
 
PROTECTED AREAS
The rich flora and fauna can be found in a large area near the Krishna river. The Krishna Wildlife Sanctuary has been established to protect the last remaining mangrove forests in the Krishna estuary. A large number of resident and migratory birds call the sanctuary home. In the sanctuary, you can see fishing cats, otters, Estuarine crocodiles, spotted deer, sambar deer, blackbucks, snakes, lizards, and jackals. Plants like Rhizophora, Avicennia, and Aegiceros thrive in the sanctuary's lush vegetation. A few other wildlife sanctuaries in the Krishna basin are listed below.
 
• Nagarjunsagar-Srisailam Tiger Reserve
• Rollapadu Wildlife Sanctuary
• Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary
• Ghataprabha Bird Sanctuary
• Gudavi Bird Sanctuary
• Koyna Wildlife Sanctuary
• Radhanagari Wildlife Sanctuary
• Great Indian Bustard Sanctuary
• Chandoli National Park
• Kudremukh National Park
• Kasu Brahmananda Reddy National Park
• Mahavir Harina Vanasthali National Park
• Mrugavani National Park
• Pakhal Wildlife Sanctuary
• Ranibennur Blackbuck Sanctuary

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